David Baddiel: My Family, Not The Sitcom

David Baddiel: My Family, Not The Sitcom

December 2018
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
26
27
28
29
30
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
Become a Member

Following a sold out run at London’s Menier Chocolate Factory and two critically-acclaimed West End runs, David Baddiel takes his Olivier-nominated one-man show to theatres nationwide.

My Family: Not the Sitcom is a show about memory, ageing, infidelity, dysfunctional relatives, moral policing on social media, golf, and gay cats. A massively disrespectful celebration of the lives of David Baddiel’s late sex-mad mother, Sarah, and dementia-ridden father, Colin. Come and be offended on David’s behalf!

Duration: 1 hour 45mins with interval

Book Tickets

  • Baddiel launches himself into the Louis CK league of no-holds-barred comedy’
       
    Metro
  • Compelling to watch both for its unvarnished truth and complicated affection
       
    Guardian
  • A show that bubbles with love and unexpected joie de vivre
       
    Daily Telegraph

People Who Booked David Baddiel: My Family, Not The Sitcom Also Booked For...

  • Ian Ashpitel and Jonty Stephens Experience all of Morecambe and Wise's most loved routines, songs and sketches in this wonderful show that hits all the right notes! A brilliant homage crammed full of renditions of those famous comedy sketches, from Greig's Piano concerto to Mr Memory, "Arsenal!" Featuring a special musical guest.

  • Unicorn Party

    Wed 11 Sep

    Unicorns, have you noticed they’re everywhere right now? As is the far-right. This hilarious, razor-sharp show asks what the simultaneous rise of these phenomenons tell us. Hunting the omnipresent one-horned icon across civilisations to explore how ideologies spread and our imaginations become capitalised, Nick Field envisions a dystopian Unicorn Fascist State Britain. When the unicorns...

  • Kemp's Jig

    Thu 3 - Fri 4 Oct

    Will Kemp - celebrity comedian, superstar of the Elizabethan stage. Kemp was a shareholder in The Lord Chamberlain’s Men, alongside William Shakespeare. But something is wrong in the relationship between actor and playwright, and when they part ways Kemp’s publicity stunt of Morris dancing from London to Norwich begins. A hilarious Elizabethan roadshow.

We use cookies on this website to improve how it works and how it’s used.

Accept & Continue